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Desktop Notifications In Gmail


Many of us open a lot of tabs and do multitasking. Checking Facebook updates, updating news, watching videos etc. If you are one of them like me there are lot of times you miss important chat messages or mails. It’s difficult to keep on checking for new mails. Today Gmail itroduces a new feature called Desttop Notification. In their official post they mentioned that whenever a new mail of chat message arrive a display pop ups.

desktop Notifications

To turn them on, click on the Settings link in the top right corner of Gmail and scroll down to the “Desktop Notifications” section. If you just want to get notified about chat messages, or if you use Priority Inbox and only want to get notifications for important messages, you can customize your settings from there too.This functionality is currently only available for people using Google Chrome.

Desktop Notification settings

Simplified Event scheduling In Google Calender


Google is launching a revamped version of Google Calendar’s event page with a focus on simplicity and coordinating multiple schedules.The updated version of Calendar has already begun rolling out and will be launched to all users in few, according  to Google. It’s sparser and simpler than the previous iteration. More importantly though, it adds several new features for easier scheduling.

First, the repeating events interface has been overhauled. Instead of taking up a full block of space, the repeating event editor appears when you check the “Repeat…” checkbox at the top of the page. This will bring up a new repeat event editor where you can specify the parameters of the repeating event.

The other new addition is the “find a time” feature, which appears as a new tab on the event page. Here’s how Google explains the new feature:

“When your friends or coworkers give you permission to see their calendars, you can click this tab to see a preview of their schedules and hover over their events to see what conflicts they might have.”

Today’s update is a set of simple but useful additions to Google’s popular schedule-managing product. The “find a time” feature is especially useful for companies or organizations using Google Apps on a regular basis.

Drag and Drop Attachments to Save Them


Gmail some time back introduced two new features

  1. Dragging files to upload them as attachments.
  2. Dragging images into messages.

Now another new feature has been introduced. If you’re using Google Chrome, you can also drag attachments out of messages you receive to save them to your computer.Let’s say you have an email open containing an attachment. Hover your mouse over the attachment’s “Download” link or its file icon and a tooltip appears that says: “Click to view OR drag to your desktop to save."

Simply click and hold, then drag your cursor to anywhere in your file system that you want to save the file. Release the mouse button, and your attachment is saved (for large files, you may see a progress dialog).

    Gmail Security Tips


    1. Remember to sign out. Especially when using a public computer, be careful to sign out of your Google account when you’re finished. Just click the "Sign out" link at the top right corner of your inbox. If you’re using a public or shared computer and want to be extra thorough, you can also clear the browser’s cache, cookies and history. Then, completely close the browser. On your personal computer, you can also lock your computer with a password-protected screensaver if you need to step away momentarily. Learn the best ways to lock your screen in Windows or in Mac OS X. Forgot to sign out? Open up a new Gmail session on another computer and use Gmail’s remote sign out feature to close any sessions that might still be open elsewhere.

    2. Be careful about sending certain sensitive information via email. Once you send an email, you’re no longer in control of the information it contains. The recipients, if they so choose, could forward the email or post its contents in a public place. Even if you know and trust the people you’re emailing, that information may become exposed if their accounts become compromised or they get a virus on their machines. As a rule of thumb, should you need to provide a credit card number or financial account number to respond to a message, provide it over the phone or in person — not over email. And never share your password with anyone. Google does not email you to ask you for your password, your social security number, or other personal information — so don’t send it!

    3. Enable "Always use HTTPS." Any time you visit a webpage, your computer needs to send and receive information across the Internet. HTTPS is used to encrypt data as it is transmitted between computers on the Internet, so look for the "https" in the URL bar of your browser to indicate that the connection between your computer and Gmail’s servers is encrypted. We use HTTPS on the Gmail login page, and you can choose to protect your entire Gmail session with HTTPS as well. HTTPS can make your mail slower, so we let you make the choice for yourself. Open Settings and choose "Always use HTTPS" on the General tab if you want to turn it on.

    4. Be wary of unexpected attachments.To help protect you from viruses and malware, Gmail automatically scans every attachment when it’s delivered to you, and again each time you open a message. Attachments you send are also scanned. That said, no system is foolproof, so if you happen to get an email from a friend with an attachment you didn’t expect, don’t be afraid to ask the sender what it is before you decide whether to open it.

    5. Make sure your account recovery information is up-to-date. Your account recovery information helps you regain access to your account if you ever forget your password, or if someone gains access to your account without your permission. We currently offer several paths to account recovery. Every Gmail user must select a security question and answer — be sure to choose a combination that is easy for you to remember, but hard for others to guess or come across by investigating. Don’t choose a question like "What is my favorite color?" as others may easily guess the answer. We also encourage you to provide a secondary email address and/or a mobile phone number, so we can send you a link to reset your password if you lose access to your account.

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